British Social Attitudes: The 21st Report (British Social by Alison Park, John Curtice, Katarina Thomson, Catherine

By Alison Park, John Curtice, Katarina Thomson, Catherine Bromley, Miranda Phillips

'...an authoritative survey of social attitudes' - The day-by-day Telegraph 'The such a lot finished examine of public opinion' - monetary instances `The Rolls Royce of opinion surveys' - the days The British Social Attitudes survey sequence is performed by way of Britain's greatest autonomous social examine institute, the nationwide Centre for Social learn. It offers an imperative consultant to present political and social matters in modern Britain. the main entire evaluation of adjusting British social values to be had, the British Social Attitudes survey record is a vital interpreting for a person looking a consultant to the topical matters and debates of this day or engaged in modern social and political examine.

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1994), Socialism, Fabian Society Pamp hlet 565, London: Fabian Society Blair, A. (1998), The Third Way, Fabian Society Pamphlet 588, London: Fabian Society Blair, A. (2001) ‘Power of community can change the world’, Labour Party Conference, Brighton, 2001 Blair, A. (2003), ‘Progress and Justice in the 21st Century’, Fabian Society Annual Lecture, 2003 Bromley, C. (2005 forthcoming), ‘Devolution and Electoral Politics in Scotland’, in Jeffery, C. and Hough, D. ), Devolution in Comparative Context, Manchester: Manchester University Press Commission on Social Justice (1994), Social Justice: Strategies for National Renewal, London: Vintage Curtice, J.

In the early to mid-1990s, just over one in four agreed with this proposition, whereas since 1998 it has been as high as four in ten. The bottom two rows of the table are also very interesting. 1, the proportion who say that unemployment benefits are too low has tended to decline over time. In this table we can contrast that with the proportion who think that “many people falsely claim benefits” which has tended to increase, rising from two-thirds in 1987 to over three-quarters in 2003. People’s views of welfare, and of welfare recipients in particular, have certainly hardened in the past few years.

And Scully, R. (2005 forthcoming), ‘Devolution and Electoral Politics in Wales’, in Jeffery, C. and Hough, D. ), Devolution in Comparative Context, Manchester: Manchester University Press Acknowledgeme nts The National Centre for Social Research is grateful to the Department for Work and Pensions, and its predecessors, for their financial support which enabled us to ask most of the questions reported in this chapter over the years, although the views expressed in the chapter are those of the author alone.

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